‘The Lost Supper’ with Matthew Colvin

Matthew Colvin joins me to discuss his recent book, The Lost Supper: Revisiting Passover and the Origins of the Eucharist. Within a wide-ranging conversation we discuss the value of rabbinic and other extra-biblical Jewish sources for our reading of the New Testament, the meaning of Christ’s words of institution, rethinking the metaphysics and the mechanics of the Supper, Eucharistic practices, and much else besides!

Jesus, the Syrophoenician Woman, and Racism

Mere FidelityDerek, Matt, and I discuss Matthew 15:21-28 and the story of the Canaanite (or Syrophoenician) woman, a story that many have seen as evidence that Jesus held racist views, from which he needed to be delivered.

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Grammatical Historical Exegesis and a Theopolitan Hermeneutic

What differences would you highlight when comparing the Theopolitan Hermeneutic and a traditional grammatical-historical approach? Also, would you make any significant distinctions between the Theopolitan Hermeneutic and Iain Provan’s “Seriously Literal” interpretive rubric that he lays out in his latest book The Reformation and the Right Reading of Scripture? He states that his Seriously Literal approach is “to read [Scripture] in accord with its various, apparent communicative intentions as a collection of texts from the past now integrated into one Great Story, doing justice to such realities as literary convention, idiom, metaphor, and typology or figuration.”

Continue reading “Grammatical Historical Exegesis and a Theopolitan Hermeneutic”