Chapter 2 (Through New Eyes)

This is the second episode in our new series on James Jordan’s classic work, Through New Eyes: Developing a Biblical View of the World. Peter Leithart, James Bejon, and I discuss the second chapter of the book.

You can follow the Theopolis podcast on SoundcloudiTunes, and on most podcast apps. You can read show notes over on the Theopolis podcast website. You can also see past episodes I have contributed to by clicking the ‘Theopolis Podcast’ link in the bar above. If you would like to leave a question for us to answer, please do so on our Curious Cat page.

Introduction and Chapter 1 (Through New Eyes)

We’ve just started a new series on James Jordan’s classic work, Through New Eyes: Developing a Biblical View of the World. In this opening episode, Peter Leithart, James Bejon, and I discuss the influence the book has had upon us and frame what Jordan is doing within it.

You can follow the Theopolis podcast on SoundcloudiTunes, and on most podcast apps. You can read show notes over on the Theopolis podcast website. You can also see past episodes I have contributed to by clicking the ‘Theopolis Podcast’ link in the bar above. If you would like to leave a question for us to answer, please do so on our Curious Cat page.

Grammatical Historical Exegesis and a Theopolitan Hermeneutic

What differences would you highlight when comparing the Theopolitan Hermeneutic and a traditional grammatical-historical approach? Also, would you make any significant distinctions between the Theopolitan Hermeneutic and Iain Provan’s “Seriously Literal” interpretive rubric that he lays out in his latest book The Reformation and the Right Reading of Scripture? He states that his Seriously Literal approach is “to read [Scripture] in accord with its various, apparent communicative intentions as a collection of texts from the past now integrated into one Great Story, doing justice to such realities as literary convention, idiom, metaphor, and typology or figuration.”

Continue reading “Grammatical Historical Exegesis and a Theopolitan Hermeneutic”